William Levinson

William Levinson

William (Bill) A. Levinson, P.E., is the principal of Levinson Productivity Systems, P.C. He is an ASQ Fellow, Certified Quality Engineer, Quality Auditor, Quality Manager, Reliability Engineer, and Six Sigma Black Belt. He holds degrees in chemistry and chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State and Cornell Universities, and night school degrees in business administration and applied statistics from Union College, and he has given presentations at the ASQ World Conference, TOC World 2004, and other national conferences on productivity and quality.

Mr. Levinson is also the author of several books on quality, productivity, and management. Henry Ford’s Lean Vision is a comprehensive overview of the lean manufacturing and organizational management methods that Ford employed to achieve unprecedented bottom line results, and Beyond the Theory of Constraints describes how Ford’s elimination of variation from material transfer and processing times allowed him to come close to running a balanced factory at full capacity. Statistical Process Control for Real-World Applications shows what to do when the process doesn’t conform to the traditional bell curve assumption.

  • 5S, which refers to the five Japanese words for clearing up, arrangement, neatness, discipline, and ongoing improvement, is a workplace organization system that also supports safety; the sixth S. It achieved proven results at the Ford Motor Company during...
  • Inspection is a necessary but non-value-adding activity whose purpose is to protect the customer from poor quality. We should therefore do as little as possible, upon condition that our inspection plan meet the customer’s requirement. Inspection plans with acceptance...
  • Process capability reflects the ability of a manufacturing process to meet specifications, and customers often request capability studies for this reason. This presentation will show how to perform a capability study, including not only the calculation procedure but also...
  • Calibration (accuracy) has been traditionally required by ISO 9001, but measurement systems analysis (precision) has not – although it has been an element of the automotive standard IATF 16949 ever since the latter was QS 9000. Accuracy and precision...